Resources

PLP's Resources Library is an online database holding PLP's guides, conference papers, published research and reports, recorded presentations, policy responses, and many other items.  You can search the items by clicking a category or a tag on the left, or using the search function.  Please note the content from conferences, such as papers and audio, are provided for public law practitioners. Public law is a very fast-moving area and some of the information will be out of date or overtaken by events. PLP accept no responsibility for the contents of these items.

 

 

Resources tagged with "Human Rights Act 1998"


  • photo for Top public law cases of the year

    Top public law cases of the year

    November 22 2017 | Conference papers | By Naina Patel, Alison Pickup, Nusrat Zar

    The number and diversity of public law cases is now such that a review of the year can only hope to cover a small sample of these. The selection of cases below (from September 2016 to August 2017) necessarily reflects our personal choices, and no doubt, there are many others that could have been included. We have each picked three cases. They are summarised below in chronological order, with some detail.

  • photo for Armed Drones and Judicial Review

    Armed Drones and Judicial Review

    January 5 2017 | Conference papers | By Sean Aughey

    The UK Government’s use of remotely-piloted armed Reaper drones to conduct lethal strikes abroad, without placing the operator at risk of injury or capture, has given rise to considerable concerns of legality, transparency and accountability. Armed drones are not prohibited weapons under international law. However, drone strikes raise serious legal issues, which differ depending on the circumstances in which strikes are carried out.

  • photo for Applications to the Attorney-General and s13 of the Coroners Act 1988

    Applications to the Attorney-General and s13 of the Coroners Act 1988

    December 9 2016 | Conference papers | By Emma Norton

    There are essentially two ways in which a person may challenge the sufficiency of inquest proceedings or a decision by a coroner not to hold an inquest at all. The first and most obvious is by way of judicial review proceedings. The second is by way of a s13 application under the Coroners Act 1988.This paper will briefly consider the law and procedure pertaining to applications to the Attorney-General for a fiat and applications to the High Court pursuant to s13 of the Coroners Act 1988.

  • photo for Public law, public inquiries and public accountability

    Public law, public inquiries and public accountability

    December 8 2016 | Conference papers | By Jesse Nicholls

    This paper considers some of the obligations and powers under which the State comes to investigate deaths, incidents of serious harm and abuse, and other forms of wrongdoing. These obligations and powers can, in limited circumstances, be used in judicial review proceedings to challenge decisions of Government and other public authorities on whether to conduct an investigation, and, if so, what form of investigation is required

  • photo for Investigatory Powers Bill, the Prevent duty, state secrecy and fundamental rights

    Investigatory Powers Bill, the Prevent duty, state secrecy and fundamental rights

    December 8 2016 | Conference papers | By Adam Straw

    On 11 October 2016 the IPB passed the report stage, which leaves only the third reading before royal assent. It is likely to become law in January 2017. The Bill is an unprecedented legislative assault on privacy. Although it is welcome in that it seeks to regulate what the authorities have been doing anyway without any formal legal basis, it contains incredibly far-reaching powers with insufficient oversight.

  • Access to Justice and Legal Aid for Separated Children in the UK

    November 24 2016 | Guides | By Polly Brendon

    Legal aid is vital to ensure that those who cannot afford to pay for a lawyer are able to access to justice. Prior to April 2013, legal aid was generally available to separated migrant children for all immigration applications that they may need to make, e.g. for cases which raised either asylum or Article 8 ECHR/EEA grounds, or a mixture.





    Now, with a few exceptions, it is available only for protection claims

  • photo for  Public law and the Investigatory Powers Bill

    Public law and the Investigatory Powers Bill

    November 18 2016 | Audio files | By Ben Jaffey, Cathryn McGahey QC, Graham Smith, Richard Hermer QC

    The investigatory Powers Bill (IPB) provides a legal framework to UK state surveillance, purporting to balance personal privacy with the needs of state to provide security and prevent fraud and terrorism. The panellists disucss the public law issues arising from the so called ‘snoopers charter’.