Resources

Category: Research


  • photo for Exceptional Case Funding Briefing

    Exceptional Case Funding Briefing

    May 22 2018 | Research | By Katy Watts

    This briefing paper looks at the history of ECF funding, including application and success rates, the accessibility of the scheme and major litigation that occured concerning its operation. The paper draws conclusions as to whether the scheme is in fact providing a safety net for those otherwise excluded from the legal aid.

  • photo for The Civil Legal Advice Telephone Gateway

    The Civil Legal Advice Telephone Gateway

    May 22 2018 | Research | By Polly Brendon

    The introduction of the mandatory CLA Gateway for Debt, Discrimination, and Special Educational Needs marked a major shift in the delivery of publicly funded legal advice.This briefing looks at teh history of the operation of the Gateway and raises serious concerns about the viability and sustainability of the Gateway as a means of delivering advice.

  • photo for Legal aid and access to early advice

    Legal aid and access to early advice

    May 1 2018 | Research | By Mary Evenden

    The overview provided in this briefing paper identifies five key issues relating to the availability of early legal advice, which arise from the reforms to civil legal aid made by the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 (LASPO). This briefing paper reviews existing research conducted by other organisations that documents how the availability of early advice has an impact on individuals and the civil justice system.

  • photo for Financial Barriers to Accessing Judicial Review: An Initial Assessment

    Financial Barriers to Accessing Judicial Review: An Initial Assessment

    April 26 2018 | Research | By Ravi Low-Beer and Joe Tomlinson

    This report provides a high-level overview of the current debate surrounding financial barriers to accessing judicial review, and what evidence is available at present. It examines four key areas, providing a snapshot of each: court fees and system costs; party funding; lawyers' fees; costs between parties; and the debate about costs reform.

  • photo for Family Law and Access to Legal Aid

    Family Law and Access to Legal Aid

    April 10 2018 | Research | By Emma Marshall, Sue Harper and Hattie Stacey

    This briefing paper examines how the cuts tolegal aid have created additional barriers to justice for many people who need to accessadvice and representation for family law matters. The paper draws on first‐hand,empirical evidence collected throughresearch conducted with family law practitioners and not‐for‐profit organisations providing support for family cases.

  • photo for Literature Review on the Use and Impact of Litigation

    Literature Review on the Use and Impact of Litigation

    April 10 2018 | Research | By Dr Lisa Vanhala and Jacqui Kinghan

    Strategic legal action is a promising, potential tool for driving change in the systems that perpetuate severe and multiple disadvantage. Yet it can also be costly, risky, time consuming and, under certain circumstances, counterproductive.

  • photo for Research Strategy 2020

    Research Strategy 2020

    April 5 2018 | Research | By Dr Joe Tomlinson

    This document sets out an initial research strategy for PLP, to operate from 2018 to 2020. The context of this strategy is PLP’s overarching strategic plan, and the organisation’s agreed priorities and goals for the period. In addition, a key aim for myself, in this initial period, is to confirm the PLP’s identity as a producer of high-quality, independent, and impactful research.

  • photo for Public Law and Clinical Legal Environments

    Public Law and Clinical Legal Environments

    April 5 2018 | Research | By Public Law Project

    University law clinics are a developing tool for both legal skills-based education and academic education. As well as providing students with experience of law in action and a practical base for academic enquiry, law clinics are, and should be supported as, an important means of providing practical legal work experience; especially where they can provide experience of working with clients who face social problems that many students may never face themselves.

  • photo for The Digitalisation of Tribunals:What we know and what we need to know

    The Digitalisation of Tribunals:What we know and what we need to know

    April 5 2018 | Research | By Professor Robert Thomas and Dr Joe Tomlinson

    Tribunals are a major part of the administrative justice system. The Government has begun to introduce digital procedures in tribunals but the full details of the changes remain to be seen. This report—commissioned by the UK Administrative Justice Institute—outlines ‘what we know and what we need to know’ about the digitalisation of tribunals. It takes the first steps towards establishing a research agenda for online tribunals and identifies a range of key research issues and questions.

  • photo for Exceptional Case Funding Clinics

    Exceptional Case Funding Clinics

    April 5 2018 | Research | By Emma Marshall

    The research presented here focuses on the feasibility of developing access to legal aid through the Exceptional Case Funding (ECF) scheme, by setting up and running ECF projects in university law schools. This report contributes to PLP’s existing research undertaken in partnership with university law clinics,1 which seeks to develop knowledge and understanding about the opportunities that clinical legal education programmes offer for extending access to justice.

  • photo for Lions under the Throne

    Lions under the Throne

    December 2 2015 | Research | By Stephen Sedley

    Sir Stephen Sedley and Cambridge University Press (CUP) have allowed us to publish the introduction to Lions under the Throne, Essays on the History of English Public Law. The first part of this chapter sketches the early growth of English public law. The second part tries to describe what it was like to be involved in the modern take-off of public law as it roused itself from its long sleep.

  • photo for The Value and Effects of Judicial Review

    The Value and Effects of Judicial Review

    October 15 2015 | Research | By Varda Bondy, Lucinda Platt, Maurice Sunkin

    The process through which legal redress may be obtained against public authorities is often criticised as being politicised, of little value to claimants, and burdensome on public bodies. Based on the largest empirical study of judicial review outcomes to date, Varda Bondy, Lucinda Platt and Maurice Sunkin explain how the process can actually benefit claimants, and improve policy and practice.

  • photo for An Independent Review of the Mandatory Civil Legal Advice Gateway

    An Independent Review of the Mandatory Civil Legal Advice Gateway

    March 2 2015 | Research | By Ben Hickman & David Oldfield

    This research paper considers the extent to which the Ministry of Justice review of the Mandatory Civil Legal Advice Telephone Gateway engages with the key legislative and policy intentions behind it, as well as the extent to which the Gateway, as implemented, meets those intentions.

  • photo for Designing redress: a study about grievances against public bodies

    Designing redress: a study about grievances against public bodies

    July 31 2012 | Research | By Andrew Le Sueur and Varda Bondy

    Public bodies have in recent years been exhorted to get decisions ‘right first time’.1 The concept of administrative justice is seen by some scholars as including initial decisions as well as what happens when administrative decisions are challenged. Notwithstanding these developments, the redress of grievances remains central to the concerns of administrative law scholars, and public bodies expend a great deal of time and money handling grievances. It is just about possible to imagine an idealised administrative system in which no errors are ever made by decision-makers and all past, present and future decisions are accepted as correct and legitimate by citizens and business enterprises. In reality, this can never be achieved (except perhaps in well-resourced administrative schemes of limited size and relative simplicity).

  • photo for Mediation in Judicial Review: a practitioners' handbook

    Mediation in Judicial Review: a practitioners' handbook

    January 31 2011 | Research | By Varda Bondy and Margaret Doyle

    What place does mediation have in judicial review cases? Research by the Public Law Project (PLP) and the University of Essex on the permission stage in judicial review concluded that most judicial review claims are settled and that most settlements satisfy the claims made in the judicial review. While some cases that settle as a result of bilateral negotiations could arguably result in a better outcome for one or both parties were they mediated instead, mediation is an unlikely option where more familiar and straightforward routes to disposal are available to lawyers.

  • photo for Mediation and Judicial Review

    Mediation and Judicial Review

    June 13 2009 | Research | By Linda Mulcahy, Varda Bondy with Margaret Doyle and Val Reid

    The aim of this research is to establish an independent evidence base for identifying the value and the limits of mediation as an alternative to, or used alongside, judicial review.

  • photo for The Dynamics of Judicial Review Litigation

    The Dynamics of Judicial Review Litigation

    June 3 2009 | Research | By Varda Bondy and Professor Maurice Sunkin

    Given its place in the UK’s constitutional system, an empirically based understanding of the way the judicial review procedure operates is of the utmost importance to users of the system and policymakers. This project offers the first analysis of the process since the post-Bowman reforms were introduced in October 2003 and does so at a time when potentially major changes are taking place to the system in the form of regionalisation and the anticipated transfer of certain cases from the Administrative Court to the Upper Tier Tribunals.

  • photo for Who Needs ADR?

    Who Needs ADR?

    September 2 2004 | Research | By Varda Bondy

    As long ago as January 1999 Lord Irvine’s inaugural lecture to the Faculty of

    Mediation and ADR recognised that, whilst ADR has an expanding role within the civil justice system, ‘there are serious and searching questions’ to be answered about its use.

  • photo for The Impact of the Human Rights Act 1998 on Judicial Review

    The Impact of the Human Rights Act 1998 on Judicial Review

    June 15 2003 | Research | By Varda Bondy and Lee Bridges

    This empirical research study drew much from the methodologies and experience acquired in the course of the previous studies, and built on the important links established by PLP with the Administrative Court, academics and practitioners.

  • photo for Third Party Interventions in Judicial Review

    Third Party Interventions in Judicial Review

    May 1 2001 | Research | By Deana Smith, Karen Ashton and Professor Lee Bridges

    This report describes the process and outcomes of an 'action research' project conducted by the PLP with the financial support of the Nuffield Foundation.

  • photo for Cause for Complaint

    Cause for Complaint

    September 6 1999 | Research | By Henriatta Wallace and Linda Mulcahy

    The aim of this report is to evaluate the procedure from the perspective of health service users, looking at issues of fairness and independence, and complainants satisfaction with both the handling and outcome of their complaints.