Resources

PLP's Resources Library is an online database holding PLP's guides, conference papers, published research and reports, recorded presentations, policy responses, and many other items.  You can search the items by clicking a category or a tag on the left, or using the search function.  Please note the content from conferences, such as papers and audio, are provided for public law practitioners. Public law is a very fast-moving area and some of the information will be out of date or overtaken by events. PLP accept no responsibility for the contents of these items.

 

 

  • photo for Exceptional Case Funding ('ECF'): Applying as an Unrepresented Person

    Exceptional Case Funding ('ECF'): Applying as an Unrepresented Person

    February 9 2017 | Guides | By PLP

    It is possible to apply for ECF without a solicitor’s help. Doing so is not easy but it is not impossible. This guide is intended to help you work out if this is something you want to do. If you decide that it is, it will hopefully help you apply successfully, but it is only an introduction and cannot answer every problem you might face.

  • photo for Armed Drones and Judicial Review

    Armed Drones and Judicial Review

    January 5 2017 | Conference papers | By Sean Aughey

    The UK Government’s use of remotely-piloted armed Reaper drones to conduct lethal strikes abroad, without placing the operator at risk of injury or capture, has given rise to considerable concerns of legality, transparency and accountability. Armed drones are not prohibited weapons under international law. However, drone strikes raise serious legal issues, which differ depending on the circumstances in which strikes are carried out.

  • photo for Letter from PLP to The Lord Chancellor

    Letter from PLP to The Lord Chancellor

    January 5 2017 | Policy, briefings and consultation responses | By Alison Pickup

    "We are writing further to your statement in Parliament earlier this month that you would shortly be announcing the timeline for the review of LASPO which the Government is committed to undertaking by April 2018. PLP welcomes the Government’s intention to conduct a review into the LASPO legal aid reforms which have had far reaching implications for access to justice in England and Wales.

    We are taking the opportunity to write to you now with some suggestions as to the areas which the Government’s review should cover. This is a non-exhaustive list of areas of particular concern and which you will no doubt wish to consider in order to fully understand the implications for access to justice and the rule of law of the LASPO reforms, given your oath and statutory duties as Lord Chancellor.”

  • photo for Judicial Review of the Regulators 2016

    Judicial Review of the Regulators 2016

    December 14 2016 | Conference papers | By Andrew Lidbetter and Jasveer Randhawa

    This paper accompanied a seminar looking at the application of judicial review principles to the regulators across a range of commercial sectors, focused on recent cases and also particular trends.

  • photo for Applications to the Attorney-General and s13 of the Coroners Act 1988

    Applications to the Attorney-General and s13 of the Coroners Act 1988

    December 9 2016 | Conference papers | By Emma Norton

    There are essentially two ways in which a person may challenge the sufficiency of inquest proceedings or a decision by a coroner not to hold an inquest at all. The first and most obvious is by way of judicial review proceedings. The second is by way of a s13 application under the Coroners Act 1988.This paper will briefly consider the law and procedure pertaining to applications to the Attorney-General for a fiat and applications to the High Court pursuant to s13 of the Coroners Act 1988.

  • photo for Bringing public law discrimination claims - some key considerations

    Bringing public law discrimination claims - some key considerations

    December 8 2016 | By Stephen Broach

    The last few years have seen a raft of discrimination claims come before the higher courts in public law cases. A significant proportion of these claims have succeeded, in areas as diverse as the allocation of social housing and the payment of disability benefits.

  • photo for Public law, public inquiries and public accountability

    Public law, public inquiries and public accountability

    December 8 2016 | Conference papers | By Jesse Nicholls

    This paper considers some of the obligations and powers under which the State comes to investigate deaths, incidents of serious harm and abuse, and other forms of wrongdoing. These obligations and powers can, in limited circumstances, be used in judicial review proceedings to challenge decisions of Government and other public authorities on whether to conduct an investigation, and, if so, what form of investigation is required

  • photo for Investigatory Powers Bill, the Prevent duty, state secrecy and fundamental rights

    Investigatory Powers Bill, the Prevent duty, state secrecy and fundamental rights

    December 8 2016 | Conference papers | By Adam Straw

    On 11 October 2016 the IPB passed the report stage, which leaves only the third reading before royal assent. It is likely to become law in January 2017. The Bill is an unprecedented legislative assault on privacy. Although it is welcome in that it seeks to regulate what the authorities have been doing anyway without any formal legal basis, it contains incredibly far-reaching powers with insufficient oversight.